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Recipe: Gingerbread Brownies

December 16th, 2021  

Are you looking for a cake recipe for the Christmas season?

Maybe we have something for you, because with brownies you can almost only win!

Brownies – the favourite of all guests!

Brownies are a real all-rounder and loved by most people. We have refined our brownies with Christmassy spices. Because after all, who can resist the taste of gingerbread and chocolate?

The brownies are perfect as a dessert for guests, for your own loved ones or to treat yourself.

With our recipe, the brownies are quick to make, easy to prepare and delicious for young and old alike. They are also easy on the gut, without refined sugars or sugar substitutes, vegan and gluten-free.

Have fun making them and enjoy!

The brownies will delight young and old alike!

Gingerbread brownies – a Christmas treat.

Ingredients:

Brownies

  • 250ml oat milk
  • 1 tbsp apple vinegar
  • 2 tbsp linseed
  • 50g dates (pitted)
  • 120g ground almonds
  • 120g buckwheat flour
  • 120g cocoa
  • 3 tbsp gingerbread spice
  • 1 heaped tablespoon baking powder
  • 90g yoghurt (natural yoghurt / unsweetened soy yoghurt)
  • 50g coconut oil
  • 100ml maple syrup
  • 150ml hot water
  • 120g apple sauce (unsweetened)
  • Zest of one organic orange
  • Zest of half an organic lemon

Cream

  • 2 avocados
  • 180g yoghurt (natural yoghurt / unsweetened soy yoghurt)
  • 3 tsp psyllium husks
  • 40g cocoa
  • 80g maple syrup
  • 1 tsp gingerbread spice
  • Some organic orange zest

Mix the oat milk with the apple cider vinegar and set aside. Mix the flax seeds with 3 tablespoons of water and pour hot water over the dates in a separate bowl. Leave both to soak for about 10 minutes.

Line a square brownie pan (approx. 18x 21 cm) with baking paper.

In a mixing bowl, combine the ground almonds, the buckwheat flour, the gingerbread spice, the cocoa and the baking powder. 

Next, drain the water from the dates and add the maple syrup.

Blend the whole thing well.

Now add the date-maple syrup, yoghurt, coconut oil, flaxseed, oat milk-cider vinegar mixture and hot water to the dry ingredients. Lastly, add the applesauce to the bowl.

Grate the zest of the orange and half a lemon with a grater and add to the ingredients in the bowl.

Using a hand mixer, mix the ingredients, not too long, and pour into the baking tin.

Now bake the brownies at 180°C for about 60 minutes.

After baking, allow the brownies to cool well. Otherwise there is a risk that they will fall apart.

For the cream, puree all the ingredients together and then pour onto the cooled cake.

The brownies taste best after they have rested for a few hours.

How long can the brownies keep and where do I store them?

The brownies can be stored in the fridge for several days.

You baked too much? You can also freeze the brownies (without the cream) and defrost them again when needed. The cream tastes best when it is freshly made.

You can find this recipe and many more wholesome, gut-friendly dishes and desserts in our recipe book “Microbiome Food”.

You can find it here: Microbiome Food- recipes for your gut bacteria

The brownies are the right dessert for a cosy Advent Sunday or Christmas holiday

How healthy are the brownies?

The benefits of ingredients for your gut health

Buckwheat: Buckwheat is gluten-free and therefore also tolerated by people with celiac disease or gluten allergy. In addition, buckwheat can help to lower the bad cholesterol level (LDL cholesterol) in the blood and allows the blood sugar level to rise slowly after consumption. This helps to prevent cravings. Buckwheat is a good source of fibre and is rich in B vitamins, vitamin K, potassium, calcium, iron and magnesium. (1)

Almonds: The flavonoid proanthocyanidin found in almonds can stimulate fat cells to secrete insulin, thus lowering blood sugar levels. In addition, almonds contain antioxidants that can bind free radicals and at the same time support the metabolism. They also minimise the risk of irritation of the digestive tract. In addition, almonds contain a lot of vitamin E and dietary fibre. (2)

Avocados: contain a lot of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Especially oleic acid, which can have an anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effect. It can have a mitigating effect on joint inflammation. Blood lipids and cholesterol levels can also improve. Fatty acids are also important for our brain and mental health. Avocados can improve our mood and help with depression by preventing the formation of homocysteine. Homocysteine is an amino acid that is produced every now and then in the body and reduces the production of our happy hormones. Homocysteine can also trigger inflammation. What you might not believe at first glance: avocados contain a lot of dietary fibre.

However, avocados should not be eaten during pregnancy or breastfeeding, as they can have a negative effect on the mammary glands. (3)

Cocoa: Cocoa contains many so-called bioactive ingredients that can counteract inflammation, oxidative stress, high blood pressure, obesity, sugar and fat metabolism disorders. Cocoa also contains many antioxidants and minerals that can promote healthy bones and reduce the risk of osteoporosis. Cocoa also contains the happiness hormones serotonin and dopamine, which can improve our mood. The flavonoids contained in cocoa also reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. (4,5,6)

You tried this recipe at home?

If you tried this recipe and made yourself some yummy gingerbread brownies, feel free to share it on your social media account and link us @mybioma. We would love to hear from you!

Check out our blog for more delicious and gut-friendly recipes. Why not try: Christmassy fermented red cabbage

Microbiome food – recipes for your gut bacteria

Nutrition is the foundation of a healthy microbiome. Giving your gut bacteria the right food will contribute to a healthy balance of your microbiome and help you feel better. In the myBioma recipe book you will find a selection of 40 gut-friendly recipes with additional nutritional knowledge. You can find more information here: Microbiome food – recipes for your gut bacteria.

Note: This article is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice or directions. The recipes are for inspiration and are not intended as a therapeutic measure. If you have any health problems, you should contact a doctor or other professional immediately.

(1): Huda N, Lu S, Jahan T, et al. Treasure from garden: Bioactive compounds of buckwheat. Food Chem. 335, 127653 (2021). Doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2020.127653

(2): Rowland I, Gibson G, Heinken A, Scott K, Swann J, Thiele I, Tuohy K. Gut microbiota functions: metabolism of nutrients and other food components. Eur J Nutr. 2018 Feb;57(1):1-24. doi: 10.1007/s00394-017-1445-8. Epub 2017 Apr 9. PMID: 28393285; PMCID: PMC5847071.

(3): Mohammed S. G, Qoronfleh M. W. Vegetables. Personalized Food Intervention and Therapy for Autism Spectrum Disorder Management. Advances in Neurobiology. Springer 24, 225-277 (2020). Doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-30402-7_9

Österreichische Gesellschaft für Ernährung. Vitamine/Mineralstoffe. ÖGE (2019). https://www.oege.at/bildung-information/nahrungsinhaltstoffe-vitamine-mineralstoffe/ [04.11.2021]

(4): Jaramillo Flores ME. Cocoa Flavanols: Natural Agents with Attenuating Effects on Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors. Nutrients. 2019 Mar 30;11(4):751. doi: 10.3390/nu11040751.

(5): Seem SA, Yuan YV, Tou JC. Chocolate and chocolate constituents influence bone health and osteoporosis risk. Nutrition. 2019 Sep;65:74-84. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2019.02.011.

(6): Steinberg F.M., Bearden M. M., Keen C. L. Cocoa and chocolate flavonoids: Implications for cardiovascular health. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 103, 215-223 (2003). Doi: 10.1053/jada.2003.50028.

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